The Art of the Recap

November 7, 2016

If a meeting occurs, but nobody sends a recap, did the meeting happen?

We have blogged about the importance of a meeting recap, but spoke more of the practice of using meeting recaps and less of the art of creating a good recap. We do have internal guidelines that we follow, but through our mentoring process we also attempt to build expertise beyond the template and guidelines. This is my attempt to share some of that company lore. Read more



“Who” Creates Risk

September 15, 2016
Costello: Well then who's on first? Abbott: Yes.
Costello: I mean the fellow's name. Abbott: Who.
Costello: The guy on first. Abbott: Who.
Costello: The first baseman. Abbott: Who.
Costello: The guy playing... Abbott: Who is on first!

Today’s blog is triggered by the entry authored by my friend and colleague, Ben Sommer, reflecting on the laziness of describing architecture with pronouns. In our roles as architects, IT strategists, or just technical leaders guiding successful project implementations we frequently find ourselves defining plans and parceling out tasks.

Read more



Don’t Hide Behind Pronouns!

September 1, 2016

“Ya know…we send them stuff”

Let’s admit first off what none of us want to admit – that most of us have forgotten what exactly a “pronoun” is…

Its basically any use of “you”, “we”, “them”, “they”, etc. – unspecific references to people or actors in a conversation or past event being discussed.

Believe it or not – the lazy use of pronouns is a huge problem in the field of IT architecture & design, and even business analysis.

Example:

  • Bob is a project architect at a college facilitating a workshop for the design of an interface between two systems
  • In describing the current flow of information between the two systems, Bob states that “We send them a file nightly”.

Who is “we” and “them”? Bob needs to specifically state it. Read more



Bank Secrecy Act Compliance

May 6, 2016

Map of Countries Under Sanction by the US Government

Compliance with regulations coming from governments and from industry associations is a big problem for our clients – whatever the industry. In working with several banks over the years, we’ve become adept at identifying gaps and designing solutions for one of the most wide-reaching regulations for such organizations: the Bank Secrecy Act – aka “BSA”.

The BSA was passed by the US Congress nearly 50 years ago. It stipulates reporting and auditing that banks must perform on themselves and their customers to identify potential money laundering, terrorist financing, and other criminal financial activities. Its requirements have only grown over the years – especially since the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US – when the federal government heightened requirements on banks and financial institutions to “partner” with it in fighting terrorists and their financial networks. Read more



Open Group San Francisco 2016

January 15, 2016

We are happy to announce that after a brief hiatus, we will be presenting again at the Open Group Conference, this year in San Francisco, January 25-27. Ben Sommer and I will be presenting in the Architecture Methods and Techniques track. 

The theme of this conference is “How Enterprise Architecture is empowering companies to build better systems by architecting for digital business strategies.” Read more



Open Group San Francisco 2016

January 15, 2016

Please join us at at Open Group San Francisco 2016 where we will be presenting in the “Architecture Methods and Techniques” track on January 27! We will be presenting a Case Study on scooping and estimation for enterprise initiatives: “Estimate What? – A Business-Driven Method for Early Scoping and Estimation of Architecture Impact.” Learn more here.