Know Your Personality

May 22, 2017

5 years ago I wrote that the best personality to have in architecture consulting was the “Type A” –¬†a personality type characterized by ambition, high energy, competitiveness, and thought to be susceptible to stress and heart disease. The whole Type A/B model of personalities isn’t a very reliable one (it was concocted by cardiologists in the 1950s), but I went with it since it is still in colloquial use, and was close enough to my meaning.

This is what they call “Passive-Aggressive”

The point was to stress the importance of being aggressive and/or assertive at the right times during your IT consulting work, although this is not always the right way to be. Knowing when to turn on your Inner Hulk, or your Inner Milton Waddams (the wimpy guy with the red stapler in the movie, Office Space) depends on where your baseline is.

So here is some wildly conflicting personality advice that will or will not apply directly to you. Read more



The Art of the Recap

November 7, 2016

If a meeting occurs, but nobody sends a recap, did the meeting happen?

We have blogged about the importance of a meeting recap, but spoke more of the practice of using meeting recaps and less of the art of creating a good recap. We do have internal guidelines that we follow, but through our mentoring process we also attempt to build expertise beyond the template and guidelines. This is my attempt to share some of that company lore. Read more



Open Group Boston 2014

May 28, 2014

We are happy to announce that we will be presenting again at the Open Group Conference, this year in Beantown, July 21-22. We will be presenting in the Health Care track with a colleague, Al Zannini, Director of Architecture and Design at Blue Cross Blue Shield of RI. Al and I will be sharing our journey to re-launch an Enterprise and Solution architecture capability, but more on that later… Read more



Type A’s Needed!

November 26, 2012

We write frequently on this blog about our proven method to deliver IT architectures based on industry-standard tools and approaches like UML and IT Risk Management. We also write about the critical intangible skills that an architect needs to succeed, such as meeting facilitation, diplomacy and organization. One needs to be steeped in all these areas – as well as to form a strong “magic triangle” of technical/business/management skills to really succeed.
Read more



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